Lindley Moor

Lindley Moor

Lindley Moor is a mast-topped hill, covered in plantations, which is locally prominent in the Wasburndale scene.

Height (m): 292
Height (ft): 958
Prominence (m): 118
Classification: HuMP
Hill No: 5316
Grid Ref: SE210514
OS Map 297
No. of Visits 3

Lindley Moor is situated above the section of the Wasburn valley that was flooded to make way for the chain of reservoirs which include Fewston, Swinsty and Lindley Wood reservoirs.

Lindley Moor from Ellarcarr Pike
Lindley Moor from Ellarcarr Pike

Although the Database of British Hills names the summit as Lindley Moor I’ve always preferred the name Norwood Edge. Not only does Norwood Edge appear much closer to the highest point than Lindley Moor, but the plantations surrounding the summit area are marked on the map as Norwood Edge Plantation.

The mast on the top of Lindley Moor
The mast on the top of Lindley Moor before the more recent plantings

The radio mast that is situated close to the summit of Lindley Moor is about 300ft high and is a landmark for miles around. I’ve not been able to find out the exact date that the mast was erected. However, an archive page on the Ilkley Gazette website recalls the surprise of local residents when the mast temporarily disappeared in 1960. As reported on the website the original mast had been erected for testing purposes and the permanent structure was built soon after.

Lindley Moor from Askwith Moor
Lindley Moor from Askwith Moor

There are two spot heights close to the mast that vie as the highest point of Lindley Moor. The closest to the mast is 292m and is a small man made reservoir so does not count as the summit. Just before the reservoir the Database of British Hills claims there is another spot that reaches 292m. This area has been planted over and I’d defy anyone to locate the summit in there.

Good luck finding the true summit in there
Good luck finding the true summit in there

0.2 miles to the east is an Ordnance Survey trig point with a spot height of 291m. The trig point is situated on a large gritstone boulder which, unless you are a brave or agile scrambler, is very had to climb up on to. The view to the north and south is more open that from the 292m summit. Especially prominent to the north are large ‘golfballs’ of RAF Menwith Hill.

The Lindley Moor trig point
The Lindley Moor trig point

The gritstone boulders around the trig point are not the only examples to be found on Lindley Moor. About ¼ mile to the east of the trig point, on a thin path through the woods, are another rash of boulders called Hunter’s Stones. Rather better known, and certainly easier to get to, is Little Alms Cliff which is situated on a small rise outside the treeline 1½ miles from the summit and a very easy two minute walk from Norwood Lane.

Little Alms Cliff
Little Alms Cliff

The top of Lindley Moor can be reached with very little climbing by starting from the top of the two roads either side of the plantation. The longer route is via the parking area at the top of Norwood Lane. The easiest route underfoot is to initially take the broad track heading south before following it round to the west.

The track entering the woods to the east of the summit
The track entering the woods to the east of the summit

An alternative approach from the east is via the aforementioned Little Alms Cliff. A thin and sometimes rough path follows a broken wall between two sections of the plantation to reach the summit area via the Hunter’s Stones. If approaching on this path keep an eye out for the random wooden hut and caravan in the middle of the woods!

One of the Hunter's Stones
One of the Hunter’s Stones

For those wanting to reach the top in a matter of minutes it is quite easy to park at the top of Brame Lane between Bland Hill and Lindley Wood Reservoir. There is space to park a couple of cars at the start of a junction of tracks. One option leads up to the mast while another slants around to below the trig point.

<< Back to Hills, Moors & Fells