Naughtberry Hill

Naughtberry Hill

Naughtberry Hill is the highest point of the very long ridge descending north-east from Buckden Pike dividing the valleys of Bishopdale and Waldendale.

Height (m): 573
Height (ft): 1880
Prominence (m): 34
Classification: Dewey
Hill No: 3613
Grid Ref: SD977817
OS Map OL30
No. of Visits 2

From the col with Buckden Pike until its termination just south of West Burton, the ridge of which Naughtberry Hill is the highest point runs for just under four miles. Thus for almost its entire length it divides Bishopdale and Waldendale, the becks of the two valleys finally meeting to the north of West Burton.

The pathless approach to Naughtberry Hill from Buckden Pike
The pathless approach to Naughtberry Hill from Buckden Pike

The word ‘Naughtberry’ is presumably an alternative spelling to ‘Knoutberry’. Knoutberry is a local dialect word for the cloudberry, a herb that produces a fruit like a raspberry. It can be found on the high moors of the Dales and North Pennines and also gives its name to the likes of Great Knoutberry Hill and Knoutberry Haw. It has to be said that I’ve not yet come across any knoutberries on the these hills though I have found them elsewhere.

The cairn on Wasset Fell looking towards Naughtberry Hill
The cairn on Wasset Fell looking towards Naughtberry Hill

Public rights of way on the ridge are few. The one that gets the closest to Naughtberry Hill is Wasset Fell Road. This excellent bridleway climbs up from Newbiggin in Bishopdale, breaches Floutgate Scar and continues on until finally giving up after passing some cairns and ruins on Wasset Fell, a mile and a quarter to the north-east of Naughtberry Hill.

The bridleway climbing up to Floutgate Scar
The bridleway climbing up to Floutgate Scar

From the end of this bridleway it is but a short distance to a shooters track as it pass through a wall. To reach the top of Naughtberry Hill simply turn and follow the wall. Eventually the wall too gives up the ghost and the way continues, following what for the most part seems to be a long ditch. With no real collecting feature near the top it is probably not the best place to go in poor visibility, unless of course you are experienced with map or have reliable GPS equipment.

The terminus of the wall looking towards the top of Naughtberry Hill
The terminus of the wall looking towards the top of Naughtberry Hill

An alternative option, when meeting the above mentioned shooters track, is to follow it as it contours around to the south of the summit above the valley of Waldendale. At grid reference SD987815 another track branches off, climbing north-west of Black Gutter. This track should take you to just over a third of a mile from the top.

Heather burning on Naughtberry Hill
Heather burning on Naughtberry Hill

The shooters track which contours around Naughtberry Hill at about the 480m mark above Waldendale is a reflection of the fact almost the whole of the hill is a managed grouse moor. In fact it is part of the Fairlawne Estate which also encompasses much of Buckden Pike and Brown Haw.

The featureless summit of Naughtberry Hill
The featureless summit of Naughtberry Hill

The summit itself is largely featureless. Although the ridge is fairly broad the panorama is still a good one with good views of the likes of Buckden Pike, Harland Hill, Height of Hazely and, to the north, the large expanse of Stake Fell.

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