Beamsley Beacon Trig Point

Beamsley Beacon Trig Point

The Beamsley Beacon trig point is situated next to an historic beacon site on Beamsley Hill, also known as Howber Hill or The Old Pike. It was built in 1949 as part of the secondary order of trig points.

Station Name: Beamsley Beacon
OSGB36 No: SD96S001
Date Built: 30th April 1949
Levelling Date: 1st June 1951
Historic Use: Secondary
Current Use: NCE Adjustment
Height (m): 393.192
Flush Bracket: S5299
TUK Ref No: TP1115
Grid Ref: SE098524
OS Map: 297
No. of Visits: 4

The trig point is sited about a quarter of a mile south-west of the highest point of the fell which is situated on The Old Pike. The huge cairn right next to it makes the trig point look rather insignificant.

The trig point is located next to a massive cairn of ancient origins
The trig point is located next to a massive cairn of ancient origins

Since my second visit in October 2009 there have been a few changes to the trig point. At some point between 2009 and my third visit in 2015 the trig point acquired a coat of white paint and a Yorkshire Dales National Park plaque. The latter explains some of the history of the hill from its Bronze Age burial cairns to its use as beacon site.

The Yorkshire Dales National Park plaque attached to the trig point
The Yorkshire Dales National Park plaque attached to the trig point

As I discovered on my fourth visit in September 2017 the trig point has since acquired a second plaque. This is from the Royal Canadian Air Force and is in memory of the eight crewman, four of whom were killed, when their Avro Lancaster crashed on the slopes of the hill on 5th November 1945. What is particularly poignant is that the crash occurred just months after the end of the Second World War.

The memorial plaque to the crew of a Royal Canadian Air Force bomber who crashed on the hill in 1945
The memorial plaque to the crew of a Royal Canadian Air Force bomber who crashed on the hill in 1945

The view from the trig point is superb, especially to the north up the valley of Wharfedale. To the west the view stretches over Skipton Moor to Pendle Hill and beyond. South the views include Rombald’s Moor beyond which can be seen the Bronte Moors of the South Pennines.

The view looking west from the trig point
The view looking west from the trig point

The trig point can be reached by a simple 20 minute walk from the nearby road. Rather handily there is a good space to park cars near the drive leading to Howber Hill Farm. It is certainly worth the relative lack of effort to reach what has to be one of the finest trig points for its combination of historical interest and superb views.

The trig point's flush bracket
The trig point’s flush bracket

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